the phrase “hand me that bag” is actually really difficult to translate. depending on what kind of bag it is, you could use pose, sekk, taske, bag or veske (and probably a lot of other stuff, actually), and since the video quality is usually pretty shitty (bc no one trusts us lowly translators, apparently), it’s not always easy to make out what kind of bag we’re talking about


one of the funniest notes I got to leave today was when the translator had left me a note saying, “Idk what kind of bag they mean here,” in the expression “left holding the bag,” and I got to answer, “they’re actually referring to beards in mailboxes.”


"THIS MAKES NO SENSE," says the translator, tearing out his hair and leaving passive-aggressive notes about content

"nope, it definitely does," I answer, because I’m both capable of reading the English transcription AND listening to the words coming out of the speakers’ mouths

Reblog / posted 1 hour ago with 1 note




fun fact: Batman used to be called Lynvingen in Norwegian, which directly translated becomes “the lightning wing”


vulcanmarbles:

celeryaneffigy:

vulcanmarbles:

celeryaneffigy:

I have been a translator for like…idk three years now, and it’s not that long ago that I discovered that the plural form of “ordre” is “ordrer”

#or that kompliment is masculine

I really think they should make it an option to use kompliment as a neuter noun, because practically no one treats it as a masculine word. I also think it should be okay to use kjevle as a feminine noun (or masculine if you only use the neuter and the masculine) rather than neuter. Kind of like nyre, which can be masculine, female, or neuter.

OMG THIS IS THE FIRST TIME I’M LEARNING ABOUT THIS KJEVLE SITUATION, WHAT IS THIS NONSENSE

all of this is unacceptable, I agree with all of your suggestions, we have to take over Språkrådet and implement these changes

I KNOW, the kjevle situation is the worst! We need to overthrow Språkrådet and take over as the new authority on the Norwegian language and fix this shit at once.

All this talk about the Norwegian language and norvagisering and fornorsking and stuff made me remember something I said to my gf yesterday, which was that my mom still says “øyensverte” instead of “mascara”. I could probably learn something from my parents when it comes to using proper Norwegian words. 

LMAO, start using limbånd and øyensverte and Lynvingen again (especially that last one)


vulcanmarbles:

celeryaneffigy:

I KNOW, RIGHT???? I even had to look it up, I had hoped it’d died along with jått, but NOPE. STILL THERE. I can’t say how much it’s used, tbh, but I actually heard my dad use it just the other day! in associating with polishing the boat. I think it might be used because it’s shorter than “poleringsmiddel.” it’s definitely only used as a noun, though. 

RIGHT?? RIGHT??? THANK THE MAKER, I thought I was alone in pronouncing it like that, this dictionary thing threw me for a loop here. maybe it’s those dang easterners???

It’s always those dang easterners.

image

there’s no better way you could have responded to that



another small source of irritation: that you can’t spell “om bord” as one word


vulcanmarbles:

celeryaneffigy:

I have been a translator for like…idk three years now, and it’s not that long ago that I discovered that the plural form of “ordre” is “ordrer”

#or that kompliment is masculine

I really think they should make it an option to use kompliment as a neuter noun, because practically no one treats it as a masculine word. I also think it should be okay to use kjevle as a feminine noun (or masculine if you only use the neuter and the masculine) rather than neuter. Kind of like nyre, which can be masculine, female, or neuter.

OMG THIS IS THE FIRST TIME I’M LEARNING ABOUT THIS KJEVLE SITUATION, WHAT IS THIS NONSENSE

all of this is unacceptable, I agree with all of your suggestions, we have to take over Språkrådet and implement these changes



I have been a translator for like…idk three years now, and it’s not that long ago that I discovered that the plural form of “ordre” is “ordrer”